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Every Which Way to Celebrate 100 Blocks Volume 11

7 May

Fellow Quilters,

Hi There, and welcome to Day 4 of Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks Volume 11 blog tour!  I hope you’ve had a chance to visit the other bloggers on the tour this week.  There have been some great posts.  I really enjoyed Nancy Mahoney’s on Day 1, as she explained how she arrived at her Twirling Rose block #1052.  Or how about Karyn Ashley-Smith’s post yesterday, where she showed a quilt made from her Crocus and Daffodil block, and done in Stonehenge?

My block is Every Which Way #1040, containing 9 arrows that get shorter as they get closer to the center of the block.

My original block done in Artisan Spirit - Shimmer

My original block done in Artisan Spirit – Shimmer

Using 1 fabric for each arrow seemed a natural choice, and Northcott’s Artisan Spirit – Shimmer has a range of 9 gradated fabrics in each delicious color palette.  I chose the sunglow palette for my block.  My quick scan through 100 Blocks Volume 11 revealed another block done in Shimmer sunglow – Jennifer Shifano Thomas’ Aloha Flower #1014.

While perusing the issue, I noticed blocks done by several Northcott pattern designers:  #1028 Moon Star by Celine Perkins of Perkins Dry Goods, #1029 Basket Star by Marjorie Rhine of Quilt Design NW, #1042 Swirly Whirly Floral by Kate Colleran of Seams Like a Dream, and #1066 Fruit Smoothie by Karen Bialik of The Fabric Addict (done in Northcott’s ColorWorks solids).  I put them into Electric Quilt along with my block, downloaded Northcott’s Celebration 2 collection, featured in our advertisement, and began to play!

Here are the blocks done in Celebration 2.  I used the pieced background block of Kate’s block, leaving the appliqués off.

Karen's block

Karen’s block

Celine's block

Celine’s block

Marje's block

Marje’s block

Kate's block

Kate’s block

My block

My block

Once the blocks were done, it was time to put them into quilts.  My block did not seem to want to play well with the other blocks, so it was my least favorite combination.  I would like to explore other options with it, such as having alternate blocks where the arrows go from the center out toward the edge (reverse the direction of them).  I think it would also make a great single-block quilt when enlarged to 36”.  However, most of the other blocks played nicely, although the Karen/Marje block doesn’t line up quite as well as the other 3 combinations.  What do you think?

Karen & Celine's quilt

Karen & Celine’s quilt

Karen & Marje's quilt

Karen & Marje’s quilt

Kate & Celine's quilt

Kate & Celine’s quilt

Kate & Marje's quilt

Kate & Marje’s quilt

Kate & Patti's blocks on point

Kate & Patti’s blocks on point

Kate & Patti's quilt

Kate & Patti’s quilt

It’s giveaway time!  I will draw 3 names: one for a copy of the magazine, one for a bundle of Celebration fabrics, and one for a bundle of Shimmer fabrics.  For a chance to win, please post a comment on my blog by this Friday at noon, telling me which quilt is your favorite.  For more chances to win a copy of 100 Blocks Volume 11, don’t forget to visit the other bloggers on the tour this week at  http://www.quiltmaker.com/blogs/quiltypleasures/

Thanks for dropping by, and please visit again soon.

Cheers,

Patti

Celebrations & Another 100 Blocks

4 May

Fellow Quilters,

Another great issue of Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks (#11!) is hitting the newsstands this week, and once again I am participating in the blog tour for the launch.logo

I really enjoy participating in these tours.  I usually scan the issue, searching for designers who are also part of Northcott’s pattern design team, or blocks that feature Northcott’s fabrics, and recreate these blocks in the collection that Northcott has advertised in the issue.  There are 7 blocks in the current issue that fall under this umbrella, including my own block – a big Woo-hoo!  Because I have a block in the issue, I have been invited to blog on Thursday as well, so I shall do “my usual” on Thursday’s blog – please come by then and check out the blocks to choose your favorite for a chance to win a copy of 100 Blocks Volume 11.  For this post, however, I thought I’d share a bit of something more personal.

The collection that Northcott has advertised in this issue is Stonehenge Celebration 2, perfect for Independence Day, with waving flags, stars and fireworks.  That got me thinking about the things we celebrate.  As I write this post, I am sitting at my kitchen counter, with the tantalizing fragrance of peaches wafting through the kitchen.  Now, I live in Canada, and peach season is still 3 months away.  For the month of August, I buy basket after basket of juicy peaches, eating them for breakfast, dinner and night-time snack.  My favorite thing to do with them, however, is make peach pies – from scratch, including the pastry, with a lattice top.  Yum!!  You need in-season peaches to make pies.  The ones you buy in the middle of winter just don’t cut it.  When I was a kid, my mom would pack my brother, sister and I in the car and drive to the Niagara region about 2 hours away to pick baskets of peaches for preserving.  Yes, I know it was child labour, but there is nothing better than eating a just-picked peach warm from the sun while filling your basket.

I spent the past week in Florida, getting my mom packed up from her winter home, and driving her back to Canada.  As we travelled up through the top of Florida and into Georgia, we passed billboards announcing PECANS.  Hubby’s ultimate favorite pie is pecan pie – gooey and thick with pecans.  After passing several of these signs, I suggested to Mom that we stop and get some.  We pulled off the freeway to a roadside stand.  Right beside the pecans were baskets of peaches – golden nuggets of Georgia sunshine.  They lured me. The young guy manning the stand knew how to sell.  “Would you like a taste of one?” he asked, and handed me a wedge of deliciousness.  It tasted just like the ones I picked when I was a kid.  “They’ll be ripe in 3 days or so,” he said. Our journey is a 3-day trip.  “Sold!” I said.  The basket of peaches went into the back seat, and the heavenly fragrance filled the car for 3 days.  We enjoyed them when we stopped to stretch our legs, and there are just enough left to make a peach pie for Mother’s Day this weekend.

Mom and I shared lots of laughs, good times and great meals over the past week.  It was a rare treat to spend an entire week with her, and I have much to celebrate on Mother’s Day.  After I dropped Mom off, I arrived home to a spotlessly clean house (even the windows were clean!) and dinner on the table.  I guess I’ll be making a pecan pie too.

What about you?  What have you celebrated recently, or will be celebrating in the coming weeks?  Post a comment on my blog by noon on Tuesday May 5th for a chance to win a copy of 100 Blocks Volume 11 and a packet of Stonehenge Celebration 2 fabrics.  Enjoy the blog tour (http://www.quiltmaker.com/blogs/quiltypleasures), and see you again on Thursday!

Cheers,

Patti

Going in Circles

29 Jan

Fellow Quilters,

Co-worker Jennifer nearly fell over today when she saw me writing this blog post.  “You can’t do a blog post today – you’ve already done one this month,” she said.  As if I only do one per month!  Well, that’s pretty much true, actually.  “Oh, but today is special,” I said.  “I am participating in the Quilter’s Newsletter’s Best Tradition With A Twist Blog Tour.”  This special issue hit newsstands a week or so ago, and contains 21 creative projects of all sizes.

Cover of Tradition with a Twist by Quilter's Newsletter

Cover of Tradition with a Twist by Quilter’s Newsletter

Nine of the quilt designers are blogging about their project this week, including yours truly.  Here’s a list of the others:

January 27, Janet Jo Smith at www.dyesmithy.com

January 28, Twisted 9 Patch, www.jendalydesign.com

January 28, Emily’s Nonsense, www.rOssie.blogspot.com

January 29, Jennifer Parks, www.jennykaequilts.wordpress.com

January 30, Nancy Mahoney, www.nancymahoney.com/blog/

January 30, Natalie Barnes, www.beyondthereefpatterns.blogspot.com/

January 30, Gigi Khalsa, www.quiltersnesletter.com/blogs/insideqn/

My modern quilt guild (www.facebook.com/barriemodernquiltgroup ) has really got me thinking modern these days, so when Quilter’s Newsletter sent out the call for “tradition with a twist”, I thought “modern”.  Northcott had just introduced the Artisan Spirit – Shimmer pre-cuts, including fat quarter rolls, so I chose 3 coordinating rolls (hibiscus, peacock and mineral).  Then I took the traditional circle shape and modified it in some blocks by making it an oval.  Additionally, I changed the scale of the blocks: the main blocks are square, but I made my sashing blocks rectangular, necessitating my cornerstones (the blocks at the intersections of the sashing blocks) to be small squares, with smaller circles in then.  Here is my quilt:

My Going in Circles quilt

My Going in Circles quilt

Since I was thinking “modern”, I did not add any borders to my quilt.  With the quilting, I emphasized the circles in the background squares and rectangles, and did free-motion spirals in the circles and ovals, all with a variegated thread.  The circles and ovals are fused in place, and when I do fusible appliqués, particularly large shapes, I like to “window” the fusible webbing – that is, I remove the center of the fusible by trimming ¼” inside my cutting line before I fuse it to the fabric.  With this quilt, I could use the centers of the large fusible circle pieces for the small circles.

Quilter’s Newsletter has a yummy bundle of Shimmer fabrics to give away, so for a chance to win, please post a comment on my blog by 9am tomorrow (Friday) telling me your favorite method of appliqué.

Artisan Spirit - Shimmer in the pansy colorway

Artisan Spirit – Shimmer in the pansy colorway

I will draw 2 names, and the 2nd name will receive a bundle of fat quarters from Northcott’s Mandolin collection that just arrived in our warehouse.  Like the Shimmer collection, Mandolin has a hint of metallic, adding to the elegance of it.

Mandolin collection

Mandolin collection

I think this collection would be perfect for the sashiko class that I will be teaching on the Australia/New Zealand cruise that I am going on next Spring (Feb. 13 – 27, 2016) with Quilt Camp at Sea.  Here is a picture of my original quilt.

Sashiko sampler

Sashiko sampler

I can already picture it in Mandolin, can’t you?  For a chance to win the Mandolin bundle, please tell me if you’ve ever been on a quilting cruise, and where it was, or where you would like to cruise to if you haven’t yet tried a quilting cruise.  That’s 2 chances to win – 1 for telling me your favorite appliqué method, and 1 for telling me where you have or would want to cruise to with some quilting “buds”.  Good luck!

Cheers,

Patti

Backwards and Bobbin Work

26 Jan

Fellow Quilters,

I’ve been thinking about you!  Around this time last year, I posted about learning new skills in snowboarding, particularly riding switch (backwards), and how that correlated to machine-quilting skills (see my Splats post).  I endeavored to practice switch every weekend, and if I did, I would surely be competent by the end of winter.  Despite my intentions, I found a million excuses not to practice – the snow conditions weren’t perfect enough, I might injure myself and not be able to attend a scheduled upcoming event, too many obstacles (a.k.a. other skiers) on the hill, etc.   Needless to say, I was not competent at switch by the end of the season.

Well, I am once again in snowboarding lessons, and this past weekend, instructor Tim tried oh-so-patiently to give us some tips on riding switch (again, or is that still?).  After the lessons, I went back out on my own and practiced some more.  It is slowly coming along.  At one point yesterday, I was way out of my comfort zone, going fast enough to really hurt myself if I fell.  Fortunately I didn’t, and this gave me a boost of confidence. It will take weeks, but I will try harder this year, and hopefully achieve my goal. As my fellow students would attest, you can teach old dogs new tricks, and our group is living proof.  Howard, my most-senior classmate, is 70 years old.  He is still nursing an injury from a fall in the terrain park last year, but he is gung-ho about mastering switch.  Go Howard!!

Hubby and I recently spent 9 days on a 32ft sailboat in St. Martin/St. Barts with my BFF Jennifer and her friend Terry.  Hubby and I sailed in the British Virgin Islands a few years ago with Jennifer, and the sailing was delightful.  Since I am not really a sailor, I was assigned the position of cook. When Jennifer asked if we would join her for the St. Martin trip, we jumped at the chance.  Jennifer and Terry are seasoned sailors, and Hubby is also quite comfortable in windy conditions.  Me, not so much.  Well, let me tell you!  We faced some significant waves (20ft tip to trough) and wind, and they had to harness me to the boat to quell my nerves.  I was once again the cook, and Jennifer was determined to keep me from getting seasick so that she could have gourmet meals every day.  I think I was too scared to be seasick!  The good news is that I survived, and even became somewhat accustomed to the rolling sea.  Hubby and I went snorkelling one day and saw sea turtles, lion fish, a moray eel, lots of colorful fish and a nurse shark.  It was great!  Here are some pics of our trip:

Captain Jennifer at the helm

Captain Jennifer at the helm

View of St. Martin from our boat

View of St. Martin from our boat

Terry, Jennifer and I at the dining table

Terry, Jennifer and I at the dining table

Jennifer works on navigation while I prepare dinner in the galley.

Jennifer works on navigation while I prepare dinner in the galley.

Now that my sailing vacation is behind me, it’s time to get back into quilting.  My guild (www.regionofyorkquiltersguild.ca) is having a show March 28 & 29, and I have a lengthy list of projects that I want to have ready.  On January’s To Do list is my project started last June in Lenore Crawford’s class at Quilt Canada. It is a small fused wall-hanging, and requires some painting to bring it to life.  I have not painted anything other than walls and ceilings, so this will be a challenge.  Time is running out, so I had better just take a deep breath and get ‘er done!  I am the challenge coordinator for our show, and the members are busy completing their entries to be handed in next month for voting by the membership.  I haven’t started mine yet!  It is my early February project.  And I have 2 sets of 3” nine-patch blocks from a block exchange a few years ago.  The quilts for these are designed, but at this point, it is unlikely that I will get them assembled, let alone quilted – one is queen-size and the other is king-size!  Unless we have a week-long snow storm, these 2 projects will remain UFO’s. Did I mention that I am teaching at A Mountain Quiltfest in Pigeon Forge, TN March 17 – 21? I attended last year and it was a total blast – tons of vendors, and the quilts in the exhibit were amazing.   But I digress.  My modern quilt group pushes me to think outside the box, so I shall try to make my challenge modern, and use some modern quilting.

I was working on my new pattern Florentine Floor for last Fall’s Quilt Market trade show, and wanted to use some really heavy thread for some of the quilting, as the fabric had a busy background that competed with the quilting.  I stopped by the Superior Threads booth to see what they had, and decided that Razzle Dazzle would work.  I wanted to use it in the top of my machine, but Mother Superior a.k.a. Heather Purcell said I would need to put it in the bobbin, necessitating me quilting the quilt from the back.  I had not done that before, so, unconvinced, I tried it in the top.  I now know why Heather is Mother Superior, because she was right, of course!  After 2 minutes of practice, I had the tension balanced, and went about quilting the quilt from the back on my sewing machine.  Voila!  It looked amazing, and I am so pleased with the results.  I will add this to my technique toolbox, and won’t hesitate to try it again.

Florentine Floor twin-size quilt

Florentine Floor twin-size quilt

Detail of the bobbin work done with Razzle Dazzle

Detail of the bobbin work done with Razzle Dazzle

Have you tried bobbin quilting?  Do you have any advice to pass along to those who have not ventured down this path yet?  The fabric collection that I used for my pattern is Stonehenge Medici.  Post a comment about bobbin quilting sometime this week (by Friday night) for a chance to win a bundle of Medici fabrics.

Cheers,

Patti

The Christmas Countdown is on…

17 Dec

Fellow Quilters,

Why is it that the days in December seem 2 hours shorter and my To-do list is 2 hours longer?  Can we postpone Christmas for a week or so?  No point – I still wouldn’t be ready!  Inevitably, someone on my list will get a “potential” gift, a.k.a. an I.O.U.  The people on my list have wizened up over the years, and stopped requesting gifts that might need to be made.  Now they ask for gift cards.

If you’ve been extra good this year and your significant other is looking for something special for you, I have the perfect suggestion:  a 15-day Australia & New Zealand cruise for mid-February 2016!  The folks at Quilt Camp at Sea  (www.quiltcampatsea.com) have asked me to teach 2 sets of classes on this cruise, so I will be doing hand sashiko

Sashiko sampler

Sashiko sampler

and fusible appliqué landscape.  The hubby has once again offered to carry my bags.  It seems like such a long way off, but I know that spots fill up quickly, and some of my classes are already full.  Pat and Len do such an amazing job of taking care of every detail on these cruises, and many of the cruisers already booked on this trip have been on several previous cruises with our group.   My quilting “bud” Dodi Poulson is also teaching on this cruise, and I am really looking forward to cruising with her again.   Dodi and I taught on the Panama cruise earlier this year, and her classes are always popular. Now, some of you are asking “What if I don’t have a significant other?”  Treat yourself, of course!  This will fit nicely in your own stocking.  Hands up, all those who put stuff in their own stockings.  I do!  Heck!  My stocking would be half-empty if I didn’t.  I put in “fun” stuff like new silicone spatulas, emery boards and tubes of hand lotion.  Of course, it would be nice to get quilty stuff like cones of variegated King Tut thread and packs of rotary cutter blades, but my family doesn’t even know what a rotary cutter is.

Speaking of quilty Christmas stuff, I was featured yesterday on Electric Quilt’s blog – they are doing a Christmas Countdown, with 21 days of free projects. 16-PattiCarey-Slider I posted the project that I made with Northcott’s Christmas Traditions collection that was patterned in Quiltmaker magazine’s Quilts From 100 Blocks earlier this year.  If you get a chance, pop on over to EQ’s blog and see all of the projects (http://doyoueq.com/blog/2014/12/ ).  My friend Linda Franz of Inklingo is today’s featured artist, and she has some terrific give-aways on her blog.  In 2015, I want to learn more of the fabulous features built in to EQ (wow! – a New Year’s resolution already).

I used EQ to design my eye-catching Emerald Dawn quilt featured in the January/February 2015 issue of McCall’s Quilting. patti-article It is made with the Artisan Spirit – Falling Leaves collection by award-winning Canadian fiber artist Elaine Quehl.  Elaine hand-dyes her own fabrics, and Northcott’s Creative Director Deborah Edwards managed to recreate Elaine’s look with printed fabric.  There is even a pre-printed fabric that looks like one of Elaine’s quilts.  The spread in the magazine looks fabulous.  I was especially thrilled to see that Sherry Bain Driver highlighted my quilt in her column on quilting.  The quilt has a fairly wide outer border, and I stretched myself with my quilting in the border to break it up and modernize it.  Sherry noticed!  Elaine’s next collection is Poppy Passion, based on her Poppy quilt, and I can’t wait to play with this one too!  The colors are luscious.

Speaking of quilting, I am waaaay behind on quilting tips for you!  In my post from forever ago (April), I said that I would include a quilting tip in each post this year.  I am 5 tips behind, so let’s get started.

1)  I baste the layers of my quilt together with a basting gun.  My favorite is the June Tailor or Avery Dennison one because the needle is small.  I don’t like the June Tailor Micro-tack because, while the needle is very small, the tacks are too short for my method of basting.  Use the needle of the gun as you would the tip of a safety pin.

Take a small "stitch" with the needle of the basting gun

Take a small “stitch” with the needle of the basting gun

To baste the layers, insert the needle down through all 3 layers at a slight angle, then come back up through to the top at a slight angle, taking only 1/8” of backing fabric.  Use your index finger on your other hand to hold the quilt down while you bring the needle back up and push the fabric onto the needle while you “click” the gun (push the tack through the fabric).  You can’t take a big “stitch” of backing fabric because the tack isn’t very long.  Notice that all 3 layers are held tightly together and cannot shift. Be careful not to put too much sideways pressure on the needle or it will break.  I always have 1 back-up needle just in case.  I put my tacks 8” apart because I am free-motion quilting and there is no pull on the quilt from the feed dogs on my machine.  It takes me 5 minutes to baste a small lap quilt, and 20 minutes to baste a queen-size one, including layering time.

2)  I wear Quilter’s Gloves by Nancy Odom.  They are the best $10 you will spend.  Once upon a time, I took a workshop from Laura Heine, and noticed that she had cut the finger tips off of her gloves.

Nancy Odom's Quilters Gloves with the tips cut off

Nancy Odom’s Quilters Gloves with the tips cut off

That day, I also took a workshop on ergonomics for quilters, and learned that the less pressure we apply with our hands and specifically our fingertips, the easier it is on our arms, shoulders and neck.  I went home and cut the tips off my gloves too, and now I don’t need to take my gloves off every time I need to wind a bobbin or rethread my needle.  I had actually worn holes in the tips of my gloves and darned them closed (by hand!).  You really want the palm of your hand to be the part of your glove making contact with your quilt – it has a much bigger surface area than the tips of your fingers.  Think of this like car tires – you have much better traction with big fat tires than with skinny tires.  Your gloves should be snug, so that when you move your hand on the quilt, your hand is actually moving the quilt and not just moving inside the baggy glove.

3)  Do not watch the needle.  I guarantee that it will just go up and down.  Instead, look where you want your next segment of quilting to be.  Here’s another car analogy:  When you drive, you look down the road where you are planning on going instead of looking at your hood ornament.  If you look where you are planning to stitch next, you will avoid boxing yourself into a corner and your quilting will be much smoother.

4)  Use heavier thread (King Tut is great) and choose something that contrasts nicely with your quilt.  When you can see your stitches, your quilting tends to be more evenly-spaced.  You will need some larger needles, such as 90/14 and 100/16 Jeans needles, so that the thread can run easily.

5)  When I stipple, I work from the bottom edge of the quilt up toward the top edge of the quilt.  This is opposite to how most quilters sew – we sew from top to bottom.  However, I find that if I quilt top-to-bottom, I am constantly backing into an area that I have already quilted, particularly if I am using a matching thread that is hard to see.  The sewing machine foot blocks my view of what is behind it.

When we went to Spring Quilt Market in Pittsburgh, we took our graphic designer Ghazal, who is taking quite an interest in quilting.  Ghazal was like a kid in a candy store as she walked the show floor.  She saw a pattern that she had to have, in a book by Weeks Ringle & Bill Kerr called Transparency Quilts.  Ghazal set a goal of having her Jewel Box wall hanging done by August 1.

A jubilant Ghazal with her Transparency quilt

A jubilant Ghazal with her Transparency quilt

On our lunch hours, she worked diligently on her quilt while I provided instruction, including the 5 tips above.  She was a terrific student!  Her finished quilt is hanging in her home.  She is now onto her 3rd project, a quilt for her bed.  Ghazal’s style is modern, and it is refreshing to see the quilt world through her eyes.

I took on another interesting non-quilting project this year – my cousin asked me if I would make his daughter’s grad dress.

Emma and her prom date

Emma and her prom date

I made her mother’s wedding dress 25 years ago, and was honored and delighted to make Emma’s grad dress.  It was fun to go back to my garment-sewing roots, and this project certainly tested my skills and knowledge of dressmaking.  Emma showed me a picture of what she wanted, and I took it from there.

Emma with her friend

Emma with her friend

Some garments are engineered, and this was one of them (the top part of the dress had no back).  The sewing was fairly simple, although it was “interesting” sewing with the beaded fabric that I used for the top.  Emma looked stunning in her gown, and I was thrilled with the result.

May your holidays be filled with peace and joy, and of good food shared with great friends and family.

Cheers,

Patti

Earth Rhythms Rocks 100 Blocks

18 Nov

Fellow Quilters,

Today is my first day in sunny Florida, after a 3-day road trip driving my mom down to her winter home from Toronto.  It is also my day to post as part of the Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks Volume 10 Blog Tour.  How fabulous to be sitting outside in balmy weather to write this!

This issue of “100 Blocks” means that 1000 unique blocks have been custom designed for Quiltmakers’ readers – quite an accomplishment, I think.  I have participated in several of the blog tours and it has been great fun playing with many of these designs.  For this issue I again jumped at the chance to play.  I scanned the issue for blocks by designers who design patterns in partnership with Northcott, and found 4 – #961 by Karen Bialik, #976 by Chris Hoover, #989 by Celine Perkins & #998 by Shayla Wolf.

I recreated the 4 blocks above in Electric Quilt.  Then I downloaded the fabric collection that is featured in Northcott’s advertisement in this issue (Stonehenge Earth Rhythms).  It is so easy to download fabric collections into EQ7 from Northcott’s website – simply click on the “Download Fabrics for EQ” button.  I know that the quilt that I create in EQ7 will look identical to the real thing, without cutting into any fabric.  I can switch fabrics until I am happy with the final result, then start cutting.

Karen’s block was actually easiest for me to design as a quilt.

Karen's block

Karen’s block

It is so pretty in the Artisan Spirit Shimmer fabrics that Karen chose for her block.  Here’s my version using Earth Rhythms.

Karen sent me a sneak peek of a quilt that she has designed that uses her block, and it is stunning.  I think it will be featured in the next issue of “Quilts From 100 Blocks”.  Karen is a prolific designer, and her designs for Northcott continually impress me!  Not only does she design patterns, she also runs a terrific quilts shop, The Fabric Addict, in Lethbridge, AB.

Chris Hoover is also a talented prolific designer, and she also used Artisan Spirit Shimmer for her block.

Chris' block

Chris’ block

Chris designed Northcott’s 2013 Block of the Month program with the Shimmer collection.

Here is Chris’ block in Earth Rhythms.

 

 

Celine's block

Celine’s block

Celine Perkins has had a block included in “100 Blocks” for as long as I can remember, and I enjoy playing with her blocks.

Here is my Earth Rhythms version.

 

 

Shayla's block

Shayla’s block

Shayla Wolf and her mom Kristi are Sassafras Lane, a fairly new pattern company.  Shayla is young, and her designs tend to be modern, so I was not surprised to see that her block for “100 Blocks” was modern.

Here is my version with Earth Rhythms.

 

 

Of course I had to play with the blocks in some different layouts.

Chris', Celine's & Karen's blocks in a quilt

Chris’, Celine’s & Karen’s blocks in a quilt

Shayla's block in a quilt

Shayla’s block in a quilt

And of course I always give away fabrics, and the folks at Quiltmaker are giving me a copy of “100 Blocks Volume 10” to give away as well.  So…. for a chance to win the magazine and some Stonehenge Earth Rhythms fabric, please post a comment on my blog by noon tomorrow, telling me your favorite BLOCK and QUILT in this post.  Please visit the other blogs in the tour as well, and happy Quiltmaking!

Cheers,

Patti

Hootin’ Holidays!

29 Aug

Fellow Quilters,

I’m not much of a pre-planner, and my co-workers will certainly attest to this!  My brother thinks I procrastinate, but that’s not true.  I do a lot of last-minute stuff, however – maybe my name should be Last-minute Lucy.  When I have a quilt to make for a show, display or magazine, the first question I ask is “When is it due?”  Then I work back from that date, allocating time to the quilt project, and fill in other necessary activities/commitments around that.  Problem is, I sometimes (okay, usually) don’t allocate enough time – to any of the commitments.  The end result is that I still get the projects done, and in the time allotted, but I have to work much faster as the time runs out.  I get so much done in that “11th hour”.  A deadline is a real motivator!  Just ask any quilter who has committed to having a quilt ready for an upcoming show – he or she is working on it daily, right up to the day before the show.  Quilts always seem to take 10 or 20 hours longer than we plan, don’t they?  Some of you are saying “No”, but a lot of you are saying “I’m with you, sister!”

That’s why, when I make a holiday or seasonal quilt, I like to make something that is really quick and easy – I want to get the quilt done and on the bed long before the holiday is over.BCQ14_Cover_800  Take my Hootin’ Holidays quilt that is in the 2014 issue of Quilter’s Newsletter’s Best Christmas Quilts, on newsstands now.  I used Northcott’s Holiday Hoot flannel collection, with its adorable owl border stripe.

Best Christmas Quilts 2014 cover

Best Christmas Quilts 2014 cover

This stripe is doing most of the work in the quilt.  I used it in the border, of course – great big 9” wide strips – and it makes a very interesting border. The effect is that it looks like I sewed lots of strips together, when in fact it is just the fabric. Then I also used the stripe in the blocks, cutting upper and lower triangles, and piecing them with bright flannel textures to create sashed square-in-a-square blocks.  The flannel textures are from the Stonehenge Kids flannel coordinates, and I pulled colors from the border stripe – golden yellow, orange, chartreuse, turquoise, red, royal and dark green – not exactly Christmas colors!  The end result is a cozy twin/double quilt that is cute and fun – just perfect for a kid’s bed.

Holiday Hoot flat shot

Holiday Hoot flat shot

 

Northcott also designed a sew-easy advent calendar to coordinate with the Holiday Hoot fabrics, and it is the easiest advent calendar ever!  You simply fold the panel along the lines indicated to make rows of pockets, and then stitch vertical lines between the columns to create the individual pockets for treats.  My boys are 22 & 20 and they still look for their advent calendar every year, as they count down the days till Christmas.

Holiday Hoot advent calendar

Holiday Hoot advent calendar

Each December 1, I pull out the Christmas stuff and decorate my home for the holidays.  This includes putting a special Christmas quilt on each bed.  I started making these quilts several years ago, and have made one almost every year since.  They usually include a panel or lengthwise border stripe, as the Hootin’ Holidays one does, so they really do go together quickly.  I also have 5 holiday wall quilts that hang in place of pictures for the month of December.  One of them was made by my Nana – hand-quilted, it is my first quilt, and I love it!

How about you?  Do you decorate your home with holiday quilts?  Is there one that is extra-special?  Please post a comment on my blog, sharing your thoughts, for a chance to win a complimentary copy of Best Christmas Quilts.  I will include some fabrics from one of Northcott’s Christmas collections – Holiday Hoot, Christmas Traditions, Old Time Christmas, Stonehenge Starry Night – or winter collections – Winter Wonderland, Alpine Getaway – if you tell me which collection is your favorite.  See the collections on www.northcott.com.  Comments received by midnight tonight are eligible.  I will choose 1 winner for the magazine and fabric, and 2 more winners for just fabric.  And enjoy this year’s Best Christmas Quilts – there are some fabulous projects in it.

Cheers,

Patti

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